Neck and Shoulder Problems

Dear old blind Bertha, having a feast in the vege patch. Easy pickings for her!

Dear old blind Bertha, having a feast in the vege patch. Easy pickings for her!

Hands up who have had neck and shoulder issues? I’m sure just about everyone’s hands are up. They are probably the most used parts of the body, as we tend to be mostly sitting but still using and abusing our upper spine with bad posture; twisting and turning, putting too much tension on those neck muscles.

I have some excellent reflexology points to make life that little bit easier. They are my best back-up plan; wouldn’t leave home without it! It settles my shoulder and neck areas quickly, when I’m feeling tired and sore from working either in the clinic or running after my chickens in the garden!

Shown below in the diagram are effective reflex points on the ears for the neck and shoulder areas.

Place your thumb just above the lobe on the cartilage and index finger behind the ear to support thumb. Rub and squeeze this point. It will become tender but keep working it for a couple of minutes or until you get relief.

It is very effective at settling down spasms or tension and the pain that comes with that. Make sure you do both ears, as if one side has the imbalance the other side will be working overtime to compensate.

The other point is on the hands. Shown in the diagram is the shoulder reflex area. Place thumb on palm side in between the little finger and ring finger. With the index finger supporting on the other side, rub and squeeze this area for a couple of minutes or until you get relief. It could feel tender or even grisly.

Your neck reflex is at the base of your thumb, palm side. Use your other thumb or fingers and rub and hold this point for a couple of minutes, or whenever you remember, until you get relief.

These are just some techniques that can help with resolving imbalances. In the world of reflexology, we have to look at the bigger picture and work with other methods and reflex points to strive for a pain and tension free outcome for the client.

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